Rapper arrested in shooting at NY City concert that killed one

Police on Thursday arrested a rapper in connection with a shooting that left one man dead and three other people wounded shortly before a concert by rapper T.I. in Manhattan. New York City Police said rapper Troy Ave, 33, whose legal name is Roland Collins, was arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and criminal possession of a weapon. Police said the investigation is ongoing.The shooting started Wednesday night as an argument broke out between rival groups associated with Troy Ave and rapper Maino, according to reports.Maino and another rapper, Uncle Murda, were performing before an audience of about 1,000 at the Irving Place club in lower Manhattan when gunfire erupted at about 10:15 p.m., according to reports.New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton told a local radio station on Thursday that police believe the investigation will be wrapped up quickly. "We have a pretty good idea of what happened," Bratton said. Three men and one woman who were shot. One of the victims, a 33-year-old man, was shot in the stomach and was pronounced dead at a local hospital, police saidThe others who were struck were a 26-year-old woman wounded in the leg, a 34-year-old man shot in the chest and a 30-year-old man wounded in the leg, police said. None of the victims were identified.Two of the three wounded were taken to local hospitals and were in stable condition. A video clip posted on Twitter showed dozens of people screaming and rushing away from the stage. They fell to the ground as shots rang out.In 2015, two people were wounded in a shooting at a North Carolina nightclub also featuring rapper T.I. Bratton told the radio station that violence is often part of the world of rap artists and music, saying that rappers are "basically thugs." "Unfortunately that violence often times manifests itself during performances and that's exactly what happened last evening," he said. (Reporting by Suzannah Gonzales in Chicago; Additional reporting by Curtis Skinner in San Francisco; Editing by Leslie Adler)

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EgyptAir flight from Paris to Cairo missing with 66 on board

CAIRO An EgyptAir flight carrying 66 passengers and crew on a flight from Paris to Cairo disappeared from radar over the Mediterranean, Egypt's national airline said. Officials said they believed the jet went down in the sea.Egyptian Prime Minister Sherif Ismail said a search was underway for the missing Airbus A320 and it was too early to rule out any explanation, including terrorism.Officials with the airline and the Egyptian civil aviation department told Reuters they believed the jet had crashed into the Mediterranean between Greece and Egypt. Greece's civil aviation chief said calls from Greek air traffic controllers to the jet went unanswered just before it left the country's airspace, and it disappeared from radar screens soon afterwards. The search in the Mediterranean has turned up nothing as yet. "Absolutely nothing has been found so far," a senior Greek coastguard official told Reuters.It remained unclear whether the disappearance was due to technical failure or any other reason such as sabotage by ultra-hardline Islamists, who have targeted airports, airliners and tourist sites in Europe, Egypt, Tunisia and other Middle Eastern countries over the past few years.The aircraft was carrying 56 passengers - with one child and two infants among them - and 10 crew, EgyptAir said. They included 30 Egyptian and 15 French nationals, along with citizens of 10 other countries. "The theory that the plane crashed and fell is now confirmed after the preliminary search and after it did not arrive at any of the nearby airports," said a senior aviation source, who declined to be identified. Asked if he could rule out that terrorists were behind the incident, Prime Minister Ismail said: "We cannot exclude anything at this time or confirm anything. All the search operations must be concluded so we can know the cause." "Search operations are ongoing at this time for the airplane in the area where it is believed to have lost contact," he told reporters at Cairo airport.The pilot had clocked up 6,275 hours of flying experience, including 2,101 hours on the A320, while the first officer had 2,766 hours, the airline said.For live coverage of the EgyptAir missing flight click: hereNO RESPONSEGreek air traffic controllers spoke to the pilot as the jet flew over the island of Kea, in what was thought to be the last broadcast from the aircraft, and no problems were reported.But just ahead of the handover to Cairo airspace, calls to the plane went unanswered, before it dropped off radars shortly after exiting Greek airspace, Kostas Litzerakis, the head of Greece's civil aviation department, told Reuters. "During the transfer procedure to Cairo airspace, about seven miles before the aircraft entered the Cairo airspace, Greek controllers tried to contact the pilot but he was not responding," he said.Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi will chair a national security council meeting on Thursday morning, a statement from his office said. It did not say if the meeting would discuss the plane.At one point EgyptAir said the plane sent an emergency signal, possibly from a beacon attached to the plane, at 04:26 a.m., two hours after it disappeared from radar screens. However, Civil Aviation minister Sherif Fathi said later that further checks found that no SOS from the plane was received.In water crashes, an underwater beacon attached to the aircraft's flight recorders starts to emit a signal or ping. This helps search and rescue teams to locate the crash and find the boxes."NO ONE KNOWS ANYTHING"At Cairo airport, authorities ushered families of the passengers and crew into a closed-off waiting area. However, two women and a man, who said they were related to a crew member, were seen leaving the VIP hall where families were being kept. Asked for details, the man said: "We don’t know anything, they don’t know anything. No one knows anything." Ayman Nassar, from the family of one of the passengers, also walked out of the passenger hall with his daughter and wife in a distressed state. "They told us the plane had disappeared, and that they’re still searching for it and not to believe any rumors," he said.A mother of flight attendant rushed out of the hall in tears. She said the last time her daughter called her was Wednesday night. "They haven’t told us anything," she said.EgyptAir said on its Twitter account that Flight MS804 had departed Paris at 23:09 (CEST). It disappeared at 02:30 a.m. at an altitude of 37,000 feet (11,280 meters) in Egyptian air space, about 280 km (165 miles) from the Egyptian coast before it was due to land at 03:15 a.m.. In Paris, a police source said investigators were now interviewing officers who were on duty at Roissy airport on Wednesday evening to find out whether they heard or saw anything suspicious. "We are in the early stage here," the source said.Airbus said the missing A320 was delivered to EgyptAir in November 2003 and had operated about 48,000 flight hours.Greece said it had deployed aircraft and a frigate to the area to help with the search. A Greek defense ministry source said authorities were also investigating an account from the captain of a merchant ship who reported a 'flame in the sky' about 130 nautical miles south of the island of Karpathos.FRANCE, EGYPT TO COOPERATE The weather was clear at the time the plane disappeared, according to Eurocontrol, the European air traffic network. "Our daily weather assessment does not indicate any issues in that area at that time," it said.Speed and altitude data from aviation website FlightRadar24.com indicated the plane was cruising at the time it disappeared.French President Francois Hollande's office said the French leader had just spoken to his Egyptian counterpart and that both sides would cooperate closely.Under U.N. aviation rules, Egypt will automatically lead an investigation into the accident assisted by countries including France, if it is confirmed that an Airbus jet was involved."We are in close contact with the Egyptian authorities, both civil and military," French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told French radio. "At this stage, no theory can be ruled out regarding the causes of the disappearance."With its ancient archeological sites and Red Sea resorts, Egypt is a popular destination for Western tourists. But the industry was badly hit following the downing of a Russian jet last year, an Islamist insurgency and a string of bomb attacks in the country.An Airbus A321 operated by Russia's Metrojet crashed in the Sinai on Oct. 31, 2015, killing all 224 people on board. Russia and Western governments have said the plane was probably brought down by a bomb, and the Islamic State militant group said it had smuggled an explosive device on board.The crash called into question Egypt's campaign to eradicate Islamist militancy and has damaged its tourism industry, a cornerstone of the economy.Islamist militants have stepped up attacks on Egyptian soldiers and police since Sisi, as army chief, toppled freely elected Islamist President Mohamed Mursi in 2013 after mass protests against his rule.In March, an EgyptAir plane flying from Alexandria to Cairo was hijacked and forced to land in Cyprus by a man with what authorities said was a fake suicide belt. He was arrested after giving himself up.In the same month, Islamic State suicide bombers hit Brussels airport and a metro train in the worst such attacks in Belgian history, killing 32 people. Investigators believed they were carried out by the same cell that was behind November's gun and bomb attacks in Paris which claimed the lives of 130 people.EgyptAir has a fleet of 57 Airbus and Boeing jets, including 15 of the Airbus A320 family of aircraft, according to airfleets.com. The last fatal incident involving an EgyptAir aircraft was in May 2002, when a Boeing 737 crashed into a hill while on approach to Tunis–Carthage International Airport, killing 14 people. (Additional reporting by Amina Ismail, Ali Abdelatti, Mostafa Hashem, Asma Alsharif, Victoria Bryan, Siva Govindasamy, Sophie Louet, Tim Hepher, Michele Kambas, Renee Maltezou, Brian Love and Miral Fahmy.; Writing by Lincoln Feast and Samia Nakhoul; Editing by Bill Tarrant, Paul Tait and David Stamp.)

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RPT-Quietly, Vietnam hosts arms gathering attended by U.S. companies

(Repeats Wednesday's story with no changes to text)By My Pham and Idrees AliHANOI/WASHINGTON May 11 Vietnam hosts a defence symposium this week attended by top American arms manufacturers, ahead of a visit by U.S. President Barack Obama and as Washington weighs whether to lift an arms embargo on its former enemy.Secrecy has surrounded the event staged by the communist country and attended by firms including Boeing and Lockheed Martin. It coincides with the biggest arms buildup in the country since the Vietnam War.There has been no mention in state-controlled media and defence reporters are not covering the forum. Efforts by Reuters to gain permission to attend have been unsuccessful and Vietnam's defence ministry could not be reached for comment.Vietnam has accelerated efforts to build a military deterrent and is the world's eighth largest weapons importer, as neighbour China intensifies its push to fortify South China Sea islands it has either occupied or built from scratch.According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute think-tank, which tracks defence trade over five-year periods, Vietnam's total arms imports during 2011-2015 represented a 699 percent jump from 2006-2010.The Hanoi symposium comes amid debate within the U.S. administration over whether to respond to Vietnam's longstanding request to remove an arms embargo that is one of the last major vestiges of the Vietnam War era.Washington eased the embargo in late 2014, but has said any decision to lift it completely would hinge on the extent to which Vietnam has demonstrated progress in improving its human rights record. Its top envoy in that field, Tom Malinowski, was in Hanoi earlier this week.Vietnam has been in talks with Western and U.S. arms manufacturers for several years now to boost its fleets of fighter jets, helicopters and maritime patrol aircraft, although Russia, its traditional supplier, maintains a dominant position. Industry sources say Hanoi is keen on U.S. weapons yet wary of the threat of a future embargo even if the current one ends. The countries do have a common concern in China, however, whose assertiveness in the South China Sea has alarmed Washington.Obama is due to start his Vietnam visit on May 22, the first by a U.S. president in a decade, underlining the rapidly warming relationship between the countries at a time of testy ties and growing mistrust between Hanoi and Beijing, which have competing claims to the Paracel and Spratly islands.MODERNISATION NEEDSA spokesman for Lockheed Martin confirmed the company was attending the Hanoi event. Boeing is also attending, although the firm made it clear it was not in contravention of the embargo."I would like to point out that any defence-related sales to Vietnam will follow development of U.S. government policy on Vietnam," a spokesman said."We believe Boeing has capabilities in mobility and intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance platforms that may meet Vietnam's modernisation needs."Those needs have included the purchase of six modern Kilo-class submarines from Russia equipped with Klub cruise missiles, Russian-built S-300 surface-to-air missile batteries, and from Israel, Galil assault rifles and AD-STAR 2888 radars. Its navy is making Tarantul-class corvettes, known as Molniyas, modelled on Russian designs and equipped with 16 missiles with a range of 130 km (80 miles).Though the communist parties that run China and Vietnam officially have brotherly ties, experts say Beijing's brinkmanship has forced Vietnam to recalibrate its defence strategy.A report in the defence ministry's People's Army Newspaper Online in March quoted the vice defence minister, Lieutenant General Nguyen Chi Vinh, as saying Vietnam's relationship with the United States lacked defence industry cooperation, and Hanoi wanted Washington "to provide modern, suitable and adaptable technology".Its outreach so far has been weighted towards Russia, India and Israel in procurements, but analysts say it is unlikely to seek formal military alliances and would stick to its foreign policy of not relying on a single power.It has, however, mulled joint exercises with another South China Sea claimant at odds with China, the Philippines, and has received recent visits by Singaporean and Japanese warships at its new international port at Cam Ranh Bay, a strategic deepwater base that is home to its submarines.Tim Huxley, a regional security expert at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in Singapore, said Vietnam's interest in getting the arms embargo lifted was not only about access to U.S. technology, but boosting its bargaining power."It reflects concern about what's happening in the South China Sea and its need to restructure and re-arm, with a greater emphasis on greater naval and air capability," he said."It wants to widen options available and have more choices in the international market place in terms of range of technology and its negotiating position."(Additional reporting by Mai Nguyen in HANOI; Writing and additional reporting by Martin Petty in MANILA; Editing by Mike Collett-White)

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BRIEF-MannKind announces pricing of public offering of common stock and warrants

May 9 MannKind Corp :* MannKind Corp says A warrants will be exercisable at a price of $1.50 per share* MannKind Corp says B warrants will be exercisable at a price of $1.50 per share beginning in may 2017 * MannKind announces pricing of registered direct public offering of common stock and warrants Source text for Eikon: Further company coverage: (Bengaluru Newsroom)

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Canada getting handle on Alberta wildfire, no restart yet for oil operations

GREGOIRE LAKE, Alberta Canadian officials showed some optimism on Sunday they were beginning to get on top of the country's most destructive wildfire in recent memory, as favorable weather helped firefighters and winds took the flames southeast, away from oil sands boomtown Fort McMurray.There was still no time line, however, for getting Fort McMurray's 88,000 inhabitants back into what remains of their town, or when energy companies would be able to restart operations at evacuated sites nearby. The wildfires have cut Canada's vast oil sands output in half. "It definitely is a positive point for us, for sure," said Alberta fire official Chad Morrison in a news briefing, when asked if the fight to contain the flames had a reached a turning point. "We're obviously very happy that we've held the fire better than expected," said Morrison. "This is great firefighting weather, we can really get in here and get a handle on this fire, and really get a death grip on it." The wildfire scorching through Canada's oil sands region in northeast Alberta since last Sunday night had been expected to double in size on Sunday, threatening the neighboring province of Saskatchewan. But with the fire moving into its second week, light rains and cooler temperatures helped hold it back, giving officials hope that they could soon begin assessing the damage to Fort McMurray, close to where the fire started."As more and more fire has burned out around the city and the fuel around the city starts to disappear ... we are starting to move into that second phase of securing the site and assessing the site," Alberta Premier Rachel Notley told the same media briefing. Officials said it was too early to put a time line on getting people back into the town safely.LONG TIME TO CLEAN UPThe broader wildfire, moving southeast through wooded areas away from the town, would still take a long time to "clean up," Morrison cautioned. Officials previously warned that the fire could burn for months. Alberta's government estimated on Sunday that the fire had consumed 161,000 hectares (395,000 acres). That was less than a previous estimate, but authorities warned the fire would likely grow overnight. Fort McMurray is the center of Canada's oil sands region. About half of the crude output from the sands, or 1 million barrels per day, has been taken offline, according to a Reuters estimate.Oil prices jumped almost 2 percent in trading early on Monday, as Canada's fire contributed to tightening supply.The inferno looks set to become the costliest natural disaster in Canada's history. One analyst estimated insurance losses could exceed C$9 billion ($7 billion). Officials said on Sunday the fire had done minor damage at CNOOC unit Nexen's Long Lake facility, in the site's yard. It was the first reported damage to an energy industry asset since the fire began. Morrison said air tankers, helicopters and bulldozers had kept the blaze from reaching a Suncor Energy Inc facility, which Suncor identified as its base oil sands mining site north of Fort McMurray, and a Syncrude facility. Suncor said on Sunday it would allow employees to return to work as soon as it was safe to do so. "We are hopeful that this will be soon," the company said in a statement, adding it planned to use temporary camps for employees and was arranging for workers to commute from Calgary and Edmonton. Syncrude said its oil sands project about 35 km (22 miles) north of Fort McMurray had shut down completely on Saturday morning, the first time in its 38-year history, because of smoke from the wildfire. “We are not currently under threat from the actual fire, it’s smoke that’s presenting health hazards," a spokesman said. Notley is set to meet with energy executives on Tuesday to talk about the impact of the fire and how the province can help them resume operations. FORT MCMURRAY STILL OFF LIMITS Even though the fire has largely pushed through Fort McMurray, the town is still too dangerous to enter. Nearly all of Fort McMurray's residents escaped the fire safely, although two people were killed in a car crash during the evacuation. The town's 160 firefighters worked nearly non-stop in the first days of the fire, even as some of them lost their own homes, said fire captain Nick Waddington. Thousands of evacuees are camped out in nearby towns but stand little chance of returning soon, even if their homes are intact. The city's gas has been turned off, its power grid is damaged and the water is undrinkable.Provincial officials said displaced people would be better off driving to cities such as Calgary, 655 km (410 miles) to the south, where health and social services were better."We are thinking about relocating in Edmonton for the time being. Maybe stay a year," said Kyle Mackay, 27, a mechanic for equipment trucking company Northern Diesel, who fled from Fort McMurray to Lac la Biche, about three hours' drive south, and is now staying with friends.His girlfriend, Sarah Smith, who left separately, is pregnant and due to be induced into labor in Lac La Biche on Monday morning. "It's really stressful, but I know we'll get through it," said Mackay. Some evacuees are keen for people to return to the place known as 'Fort Mac,' or 'Fort McMoney' for its well-paid oil jobs."I'm trying to convince people Fort McMurray is a good place to return and rebuild," said Curtis Phillips, who has worked in the media in the town, speaking at a "reception center" in Lac La Biche providing food, shelter and services for the displaced. "People will return because of the high salaries and benefits," he said.  Officials said on Sunday that 34 wildfires were burning, with five out of control. There are more than 500 firefighters battling the blaze in and around Fort McMurray, with 15 helicopters and 14 air tankers. (Additional reporting by Ethan Lou, Allison Martell, David Ljunggren and Nia Williams; Writing by Bill Rigby; Editing by Alan Crosby and Peter Cooney)

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